character houses for sale in france saone et loire cluny

In the French department of Saône-et-Loire, in the medieval town of Cluny,
a listed, 12th & 15th century house
Mâcon, SAONE-ET-LOIRE burgundy 71000 FR

Location

This house stands just a few minutes’ walk from Cluny Abbey, 4 hours away from Paris via the A6 motorway and just 2 hours by TGV train to Mâcon station. It is 2½ hours from Geneva and less than an hour from Lyon by train. Set on the edge of a luminous square, the building has the benefit of a wonderful location in the midst of a character town. The great cultural and artistic interest of the place continually attracts tourists from all over the world. The town is also renowned for its economic vitality.

Description

Near to the biggest and most renowned of medieval abbeys, in the historic centre of the town, this house stands on the corner of a historic shopping street and a lively square.
Constructed from two initially separate structures: the current house is a combination of two narrow medieval constructions. The first, on the left-hand side, is a perfect example of local urban architecture in the 12th century. The second, on the right-hand side, dates from the 15th century.
The facade is therefore half Romanesque and half Gothic in style. The ground floor of the Romanesque section features a wide segmental arch which formed the shopfront of a small shop. This arch is aided by a wide beam. On the first floor, light enters via a double window, the two sections separated by a thin column, topped with a capital bearing foliage. The second floor is widely opened by a geminated window featuring four arches. Two thin columns and a central mullion divide this opening, topped with wrought blind arcading as well as a frieze decorated with simplified roses. This building, in a good state of repair, bears witness to the finesse of Cluny’s houses in the early 1200’s.
The Gothic section of the facade is composed of a semi-circular arch which was also used for trade purposes. A door on the corner is the main entrance to the house, its lintel is engraved with the year 1594 when restauration works were carried out. On the first floor, a wide mullioned window illuminates the old living room. The second floor is constructed from half-timbering: two rows of ties comprising St Andrew’s crosses include two straight windows.
Some 15 or so years ago, the DRAC (Regional Cultural Affairs Agency) had major works carried out in order to reinforce the structure by lining the party wall between the two primitive houses with concrete.

The house

The facade is therefore half Romanesque and half Gothic in style. The ground floor of the Romanesque section features a wide segmental arch which formed the shopfront of a small shop. This arch is aided by a wide beam. On the first floor, light enters via a double window, the two sections separated by a thin column, topped with a capital bearing foliage. The second floor is widely opened by a geminated window featuring four glazed sections. Two thin columns and a central pilaster divide this opening, topped with wrought blind arcading as well as a frieze decorated with simplified roses. This building, in a good state of repair, bears witness to the finesse of Cluny’s houses in the early 1200’s.
The Gothic section of the facade is composed of a semi-circular arch which was also used for trade purposes. A door on the corner is the main entrance to the house, its lintel is engraved with the year 1594 when restauration works were carried out. On the first floor, a wide mullioned window illuminates the old living room. The second floor is constructed from half-timbering: two rows of ties comprising St Andrew’s crosses include two straight windows.
Some 15 or so years ago, the DRAC (Regional Cultural Affairs Agency) had major works carried out in order to reinforce the structure by lining the party wall between the two primitive houses with concrete.


Ground floor
The inside of the house is divided, like the facade, into two structures.
The corner entrance room has two openings: the shop window and another window overlooking the square. Terracotta floor tiles, wide joists and a stone sink preserve an appearance exuding authenticity. The entrance room provides access, left, into a long, adjoining room, forming the ground floor of the Romanesque section; opposite the entrance door are a wooden stairway and a corridor, leading to a recently converted kitchen. A shop window in the long room on the left-hand side is its sole opening. Laid out lengthwise, this area has been used as a shop for centuries. A vast stone fireplace, with a moulded wooden mantel, and a well, the masonry of which protrudes from the ground, are reminders of the former uses of the premises. The walls are composed of exposed, small, regular stone blocks, apart from one which is built of brick and half-timbering.
The upstairs await full conversion works to make them habitable. No recent restoration works have diminished the character of the premises.

First floor
The upstairs is reached via an old wooden stairway. The landing leads to a blind room, with terracotta floor tiles and exposed ceiling joists. On the opposite side, overlooking the street, a room with regular, blackened joists is laid out around an 18th century fireplace. The mullioned window, letting in light, is flanked by window seats. Consolidation of the building has left a bare concrete floor and central wall.
A landing provides access to the other section, laid out in a similar manner with a blind room, awaiting conversion, and a room, overlooking the street, enhanced with a Louis XV style fireplace.
A stairway with curved balusters goes up to the second floor.

Second floor
The second-floor landing leads, as on the floor below, to two facade rooms. Once again, a blind room is set at the back of the floor. The room overlooking the street, on the left-hand side, provides access to a little, glazed gallery, featuring a Romanesque window with four arches. The leaded panes were recently restored. An old shutter hanging on the wall recounts the comical tale of a flour thief who stole in through the window in 1691.
A room, on the right-hand side, looks out over the street and the square via two windows set within the half-timbering.
An attic can be reached via an old stairway.

Our opinion

This house is one of the most beautiful examples of the local architecture in its district not only because of its facade but also because of its preserved internal structure. Eight centuries after its construction, its two large, low openings give this building all the potential it needs for these premises to continue as a shop. There would be no lack of regular custom courtesy of the town’s tourist trade.
The upper levels still await restoration works to give them back their splendour of yesteryear.
The site and its surroundings make these premises ideal for the creation of a cultural and/or commercial activity, a house, or all three. Sources of finance and French tax laws pertaining to listed historic monuments are an invaluable asset here.

Exclusive sale

180 000 €
Honoraires à la charge du vendeur


Voir le Barème d'Honoraires

Reference 274100

Main building surface area 193 m2

Regional representative


Patrice Besse       +33 1 42 84 80 85

contact

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NB: The above information is not only the result of our visit to the property; it is also based on information provided by the current owner. It is by no means comprehensive or strictly accurate especially where surface areas and construction dates are concerned. We cannot, therefore, be held liable for any misrepresentation.

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