A country chateau, dating from 1640 and 1850, surrounded by its 25 ha of land,
enhanced with a lake and a river, just 2 hours from Paris
Auxerre, YONNE burgundy 89000 FR

Location

This property, ideally located between Paris and Dijon in the north of Burgundy, is in a village not far from the historic town of Auxerre. This residence, near to all amenities, is just 15 minutes from a train station with links to Paris-Bercy taking less than 2 hours. Having grown up on the left bank of the river Yonne since the Gallo-Roman era, the village still has some historic buildings such as its discreet, 17th century church, devoted to Saint-Léger, as well as its chateau. Said church features the coats-of-arms of the Boulard-de-Vaucelles family who lived on the property in the 19th century. The small market town in which the chateau stands still has all of its character despite the proximity of a large town. The chateau is, however, one of its major monuments.

Description

A lime tree-lined driveway leads to an impressive gateway which opens on to extensive parklands where a dovecote stands facing a row of several buildings dating from the 16th and 17th centuries, and comes to an end by a more impressive 19th century building. A gravelled path is intended for parking vehicles at the foot of the chateau. The setting is both verdant and varied, planted with rare species of trees hundreds of years old, such as purple beech, sequoia and old oak trees. A lime tree-lined driveway runs alongside the old farm buildings which could be converted into holiday rental accommodation units.
This property is dotted with water supply points such as a lake, carpeted with pastel-coloured waterlilies, home to carp and sturgeon. The woods surrounding the property are intersected by an alleyway lined with plane trees, forming a forest canopy. An old bridge spans a fish-filled river.
A 400-year-old oak tree is still full of vigour and majesty.
An orchard, composed of fruit trees such as pear, apple, hazelnut and fig, is near to the residence, not far from a fruit store. A tennis court, in a good state of repair, faces the chateau’s old farm buildings and an orangery.

The chateau: the 19th century west wing

The chateau constructed in the 14th century was the theatre of events during the Holy League Wars which fired the region as it was used as a refuge by the aristocracy from Auxerre. The illustrious Estampes family, originally from the Berry region, owned the chateau for a century. Claude-d'Estampes, captain of the guard for François of France, opted to support Henry IV, in the middle of the religious war. He brought all the aristocrats to the residence in 1589 in order to call a halt to local battles and to define means for maintaining peace.
The oldest section of the chateau is flanked by two pavilions, covered with traditional, flat roof tiles. The buildings are topped with Mansard style, gable and hip roofs, all of which feature roof dormers. The facades are dotted with small-paned openings, framed with stone surrounds. A central, fan-shaped tympanum enhances the building. The architecture of the second pavilion is more highly wrought. Two brick and regional stone bull’s eye windows are set on each side of an opening, featuring a white stone, semi-circular arch.
The facade is enhanced with some animal ornamentation, demonstrating the importance of the herd at that time. In fact, the chateau’s agricultural activity was a model farm and was the biggest in the region during the 19th century. The colours of the facade blend harmoniously with the dovecote which takes pride of place in the middle of the property. The second, more recent section features Mansard style architecture and the roofs are covered with slate. The double, small-paned windows are fitted with wooden, slatted shutters. A central, glass and metal veranda precedes the main entrance to the building. It stands out courtesy of a fine, highly wrought frieze, bordering the top. On the first floor on the south side are two large, double windows, enhanced with wrought iron railings, featuring some gilding and two central hoopoes with gilt beaks.


Ground floor
The ground floor is accessed via double doors which open into a veranda where natural light is reflected by the Burgundy stone covering the floor. A second door opens into a vestibule, laid with floor tiles featuring inlaid decoration. On one side, a pantry is marked by rounded, dark-wood cupboards and panelling. Facing the vestibule, double wooden doors open into a study, lined with a large bookshelf unit. This extremely bright room has a view over the parklands. It has an adjoining bedroom. On the other side of the entrance hall are several adjoining rooms, with large windows and vaulted ceilings. A lounge has a stone fireplace, fitted with a closed-hearth fire. The stone hearth tiles extend out into the room. A dining room is laid out near to a fully fitted kitchen with a Delft tile splashback. Another room is a second, more modern kitchen and laundry room where the floor is covered with old terracotta tiles. It also has a vaulted ceiling. The vestibule also houses a wooden stairway going to the two upper floors. It includes an intermediate landing and has wrought iron railings.
First floor
The ground floor is accessed via double doors which open into a veranda where natural light is reflected by the Burgundy stone covering the floor. A second door opens into a vestibule, laid with floor tiles featuring inlaid decoration. On one side, a pantry is marked by rounded, dark-wood cupboards and panelling. Facing the vestibule, double wooden doors open into a study, lined with a large bookshelf unit. This extremely bright room has a view over the parklands. It has an adjoining bedroom. On the other side of the entrance hall are several adjoining rooms, with large windows and vaulted ceilings. A lounge has a stone fireplace, fitted with a closed-hearth fire. The stone hearth tiles extend out into the room. A dining room is laid out near to a fully fitted kitchen with a Delft tile splashback. Another room is a second, more modern kitchen and laundry room where the floor is covered with old terracotta tiles. It also has a vaulted ceiling. The vestibule also houses a wooden stairway going to the two upper floors. It includes an intermediate landing and has wrought iron railings.
Second floor
The second floor, currently undergoing restoration works, comprises eight very spacious, bright bedrooms. They all have parquet flooring and most include a marble, open-hearth fireplace. Several rooms have exposed oak wood ceiling beams and wooden cupboards. There are several bathrooms with wash-hand basins, showers or baths.

The chateau: the 17th century wing

The oldest section of the chateau dates from 1650. The age of the architecture is reflected through its mullioned windows and its light-coloured lime rendering.


Ground floor
A semi-circular arched door opens into a large ballroom, with a 4 m high ceiling. The floor is covered with large Burgundy stone tiles, whilst the ceiling features exposed oak wood beams. All the openings have stone surrounds. Adjoining the ballroom, a fully fitted kitchen used by outside caterers has a back door leading outside. Two stone steps lead to a landing which provides access to a second, slightly smaller room, with a stone and brick fireplace, small-paned windows and indoor, wooden shutters. An adjoining lounge has a stone fireplace, fitted with a traditional, Godin closed-hearth fire. A straight wooden stairway, with balusters, goes up to the first floor.
First floor
Two function rooms follow on one from the other. The floors here are covered with old terracotta tiles and the ceilings feature exposed joists. Large mullioned windows look out over the parklands and more especially the chateau’s lake.

The dovecote

The dovecote is one of the outstanding features of the original construction. Spanning a surface area of approx. 60 m², it could accommodate guests for festive get-togethers. Its roofing framework is formed from a central column and several cross-arms linking the post to a ladder that turns so as to provide access to the dove-holes. It is made very bright by little, small-paned, wooden openings which illuminate the old terracotta floor tiles which are in an excellent state of repair. This dovecote contains 780 dove-holes, the number of dove-holes being proportional to the surface area of the farm lands. It is therefore an outward sigh of wealth. Some owners added imitation dove-holes to make believe that they owned a lot of land which is apparently where the French expression “se faire pigeonner” (meaning to be taken for a ride) comes from.

A fruit store

A fruit store stands facing the chateau’s old orchard. It is not clear whether this building was actually used for storing fruit or cheese. In fact, a model farm where animals were raised adjoined the chateau in the 19th century.

A small holiday rental accommodation unit set in the old farm buildings

This building has been transformed into a small holiday rental accommodation unit, spanning approx. 60 m². It comprises a large living room, with an open-plan kitchen, exposed ceiling joists and old terracotta floor tiles. Upstairs are two spacious bedrooms.

Our opinion

Buildings of differing styles from various eras, perfect examples of architectural moments ever part of a logical continuity from history to bygone times, are aligned from east to west. The chateau is in pristine condition: roofs have been redone in keeping with good trade practices, double glazing is the order of the day and most of the rooms have been restored. This property could be opened to the general public and used for bed & breakfast as well as holiday rental accommodation and function activities, including weddings and training courses, or remain completely private.
The inside of the buildings exudes miscellaneous distinctive characters, sometimes a little monastic, which is therefore an invitation to retreat from the turbulent world and relax, far from the urban way of life which is, in fact, so near.

1 505 200 €
Fees at the Vendor’s expense


See the fee rates

Reference 842810

Land registry surface area 25 ha 40 ca
Main building surface area 1216 m2
Outbuilding surface area 600 m2
Number of bedrooms 17

French Energy Performance Diagnosis

Regional representative


Isabelle Ponelle +33 1 42 84 80 85

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NB: The above information is not only the result of our visit to the property; it is also based on information provided by the current owner. It is by no means comprehensive or strictly accurate especially where surface areas and construction dates are concerned. We cannot, therefore, be held liable for any misrepresentation.

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