castles / chateaux for sale - côte-d'or - burgundy

A Burgundy “folly” with its Italian-style theatre, its outbuildings
and its natural parklands not far from Beaune

Beaune, COTE-D'OR burgundy 21200 FR
Bourgogne

Location

200 minutes from Paris via the A6 motorway, 150 minutes from Geneva via the A40 motorway and just 20 minutes from Beaune. The “Climats de Bourgogne” (Burgundy vineyards), classified as a World Heritage site by Unesco, are but a few minutes away. Dominated by its 16th century church, the commune is crossed by two rivers and a stream: the Dheune, the Vandène and the Reuil-de-Champseuil. This property stands on the outskirts of a village, facing the fields which extend over the bocage landscape for as far as the eye can see. The nearest shops are in Beaune, a town very well-known for its way of life and its heritage.

Description

This “folly” is the result of the imagination of a man in the late 19th, early 20th century. This residence was originally an ordinary vinegrowers’ house, comprising two dwellings, the origins of which dated back to the reign of Louis XIII. Bearing witness to this are the fermenting room, the cellar and the old outbuildings which would have been used for farming purposes and are still in their original condition. He purchased it around 1870 and transformed it into a neo-gothic style “castle” by means of endless works which continued until his death in 1905. Said works resulted in keeps and turrets as well as a gothic building, to which was also added a genuine Italian-style theatre with a ballroom. However, some of the features of this colourfully architectural property have since disappeared. Those remaining are nevertheless disparate and whimsical.
Miniature castle entrance gates, on the north side, open into an inner courtyard. The main building, on the west side, faces the outbuildings. The end of the courtyard on the south side is closed by iron railings. Beyond, parklands slope gently down to a little river. All around the buildings are grassy meadows and a few trees. A pavilion and an extending wall, on the east side, separate the property from the village; the north side is enclosed by a hedge. The south and west sides have a completely unobstructed view over the bocage landscape, featuring the river, country lanes, hedges of trees and a few ditches. A stone cave, with holes, provides the premises with a touch of mystery.

The miniature castle entrance

A lane leads straight to the miniature castle entrance gates, an authentic 18th century feature brought from an old monument. The porch way to the miniature castle entrance, also called dome, is closed by an oak wood door which also comes from an old mansion house. The adjacent brick and dressed stone walls are topped with balusters. The walls are raised to support a gallery forming a passageway between the main house and the theatre outbuildings. The facade, on the courtyard side, features a succession of arcades intermingled with pilasters. The dome, flanked by turrets, is covered with flat, highly coloured, glazed tiles. On the entrance side of the porch way, the walls consist of brick masonry filler. The prominent section has an imitation balustrade and a colonnade which appears to support the dome. This astonishing architecture is purposely enhanced by glazed roofs, clearly visible from the road, the roof being plainer, without any colours, on the inside slope. The gallery measures almost 16x24 m.

The main building

The main, neo-gothic style building, set on the west side, has two dressed stone wings which are set back. The roofs, covered with flat Burgundy tiles, feature roof dormers, one of which is an internal dormer. Acroteria decorate the ridges. The facade is aligned with Doric order columns with small capitals and basket-handle arched openings on the ground floor. The upstairs in the central building has lancet, coloured stained glass windows. The wings, set back, feature vast rectangular windows with sculpted modillions, ogees and small coats-of-arms.


Cellar
A small vaulted cellar can be reached from inside the main building. Unfortunately, it cannot be put to any good use as it is often flooded.
Ground floor
The porch way steps lead from the courtyard into the vestibule which provides access, on the left-hand side, to a small room, in use as a cloakroom, and to a lounge, with a white ceiling, which precedes a large kitchen, with a fireplace and ceiling beams decorated with geometric patterns. A laundry room and a small bedroom as well as a toilet comprise the rest of this level. The vestibule also houses the unique, gothic style, wrought oak wood stairway with its chevron patterns, crosses and small medieval type characters at the foot of the railings. The vestibule floor is covered with cement tiles whilst the cloakroom has terracotta floor tiles. The tiling in the lounge is more modern but has the old-fashioned inlaid decoration whilst the kitchen has terracotta floor tiles.
First floor
The stairway leads up to a gallery opening into two, fully decorated rooms, with herringbone pattern parquet flooring and French oak wood ceilings. The gallery has several large lancet windows with stained glass featuring cruciferous ornaments that bring the four-lobed openings of the Medieval period to mind. The yellow and red-ochre tints are also a reference to the Middle-Ages. The first room, called dining room, looks out over the courtyard side via large windows, throwing light on to the interior panelling and the gothic style fireplace. The panelling forms dark, painted panels with a few sky blue and gold touches just as Charles-Suisse, one of the leading historic monument architects, liked them. The painted ceiling features red and gilt floral motifs, arabesques and small gilt chessboard patterns. The fireplace is topped with a sort of canopy carved with motifs similar to those of the gallery’s stained glass. The doors in this room were taken from an old mansion house. The second room, called lounge, is magnificent. The French ceiling is red and gold in colour, enhanced with half beams, brackets, corbelling and miscellaneous ornaments such as gilt modillions. The white and gold panelling is decorated with panels painted by Druard and Couturier. The iconography is rich: a fox hunt, quail in a nest in the wheat, snipes, a young fawn with its mother, a peasant keeping watch over his cows... and, apparently, the owner of the premises himself with his sister and his niece - he can also be seen in another panel with a hare and his wife, flanked by his niece and nephew. An imitation, painted wood fireplace has replaced a period fireplace. Five double, white and gold, oak wood doors have origins that would surprise more than one person. Also upstairs, two bedrooms with parquet flooring and painted ceilings, as well as an old smoking room or study. The latter communicates with the lounge and the gallery. The blue plaster, rendered walls and the ceiling are divided into sections by gilt beading. The bedroom ceilings are decorated with doves in blue skies, the central panels are surrounded by gilt framing with corner stones featuring fleur-de-lis. The panelling is an original feature. A bathroom adjoins the two bedrooms.
Second floor
The attic space has been comfortably converted into a self-contained flat. The floors are covered with light-coloured carpet, the walls and the ceilings are white. It comprises several rooms, including one large one which runs the full length, forming a study and a lounge, on one side, and a hall area leading to a bedroom, a kitchen and a shower room with a new toilet on the other.

The outbuildings

The main outbuilding is constructed of brick on stone foundations. Spanning a single level, it is covered with a grey tile roof, topped, with an oculus. It adjoins the wing set at right angles of the entrance pavilion which houses the entrance to the theatre. At the end of this building, an old imitation keep, with walls rendered with imitation pointing to resemble dressed stone, is of a good size. It is topped with an upper terrace featuring battlements. There are, therefore, three separate outbuildings. In order from the miniature castle entrance, the ground floors comprise a fermenting room and an adjacent cellar, followed by a large room with a fireplace opening into another large room; both are used for storage purposes. Next, a large room comprises a closed sauna and another room reached from the storage rooms. And lastly, a stable and a tack room. On the first level of the keep is a large garage.


Winery
This superb, quarry stone block room houses the oil tank and the firewood.
Cellar
The cellar adjoins the fermenting room and is not underground.
The stables
The actual stable is magnificent. The mangers, made of dark red marble from Flanders, came from the demolition of a Parisian palace. The tack room itself is a bare, plain room.
Store room
This comprises a large room set between the old stables and the cellar, another adjoining room and a third one, spanning 17 m², housing a sauna measuring more than 3 m². There is a gothic fireplace.
Garage
The garage is the ground floor of the keep. The entrance from the inner courtyard is closed by a superb large, red painted, oak wood door.

The theatre

The left wing which contained the servants’ quarters was raised around 1882 such that it matched the right-hand wing, comprising accommodation. This wing is home to the theatre which is, therefore, upstairs but it is entered via the courtyard on the ground floor. Its old foyer was used as a billiards’ room. At the end of the theatre, on the stage side, a door opens into the attics of the outbuildings, at the end of which, it is possible to access the keep via an intermediate floor. A large stairway leads up to an upper floor and to a large room with a wooden “Chambord” stairway which was built in line with that of the famous castle. It goes up to a terrace with a superb panoramic view over the castle and its surroundings. The last large room, called ballroom, comprises panelling, painted with floral motifs. It is adjoined by a small smoking room. The parquet flooring has been flooded and has holes in places.


Ground floor
The marble entrance stairway was modelled on that in the Paris Opera House. The bases are sea green, the balusters are antique red and the handrail white with green striation. The wall panels are composed of imitation Languedoc marble.
First floor
The dressing rooms and the stage are topped with a cupola forming a light well. It is decorated with extremely delicate floral motifs. The theatre is a real gem. The large, central dressing room, padded with red silk, is flanked by side dressing rooms in a similar vein. The overall style is rather strange and brings Egypt, Persia and China to mind. The richness of the ornamentation combines a profusion of geometric, musical and floral motifs. The large doors are Louis XV style with gilt and leaf decor. The old theatre foyer is now called “billiards’ room. An iron beam has been installed the full width of the farm building above the courtyard. The wooden coffered ceiling was made to measure. The reddish brown hues contrast with the gilt finish, the central section is adorned with a gilt square featuring small flowers.

The chapel

The dressing rooms and the stage are topped with a cupola forming a light well. It is decorated with extremely delicate floral motifs. The theatre is a real gem. The large, central dressing room, padded with red silk, is flanked by side dressing rooms in a similar vein. The overall style is rather strange and brings Egypt, Persia and China to mind. The richness of the ornamentation combines a profusion of geometric, musical and floral motifs. The large doors are Louis XV style with gilt and leaf decor. The old theatre foyer is now called “billiards’ room. An iron beam has been installed the full width of the farm building above the courtyard. Panelling flanked by small columns and golden brown pilasters have been installed. The painted panels are of a Renaissance style with men and women in period costume in a comical manner in reference to the theatre comedies. The wooden coffered ceiling was made to measure. The reddish brown hues contrast with the gilt finish, the central section is adorned with a gilt square featuring small flowers.

Our opinion

This residence, in accordance with its designer’s wishes is extremely theatrical. It reflects the owner’s whimsical side and his great liking for artistic and architectural references which his prosperity allowed him to indulge. This property is particularly heterogeneous, dotted with references that range from old medieval houses to theatrical representations. The wisdom of the insane and the lunacy of the wise, all are steeped in charm, even magic. Its decors were often taken at the end of the 19th century from old Parisian mansion houses, certain coming from the Russian embassy and even the Palais-des-Tuileries, hence their quality and their sometimes impressive character. Despite its original features, the main building comprises an appreciably comfortable residential home, but some internal conversion and maintenance works will have to be carried out.

Exclusive sale

640 000 €
Honoraires à la charge du vendeur


Voir le Barème d'Honoraires

Barème d'honoraires
au 1er Avril 2017

Ventes d'immeubles

À Paris et en Ile-de-France
Prix de vente au-delà de 600 000 euros       5% TTC*
Prix de vente de 400 000 à 600 000 euros   6% TTC*
Prix de vente de 200 000 À 400 000 euros   7% TTC*
Prix de vente jusqu'à 200 000 euros             9% TTC*
Honoraires à la charge du Vendeur

En Province
Prix de vente au-delà de 500 000 euros       6% TTC*
Prix de vente jusqu'à 500 000 euros   30 000 Euros TTC* (forfait)
Honoraires à la charge du Vendeur

Expertise

Avis de valeur argumenté : 1 800 Euros TTC*
Expertise à partir de 2 400 Euros TTC*
Les tarifs des expertises sont communiqués sur devis personnalisé établi sur la base d’un taux horaire moyen de 120 Euros TTC*

   

*TTC : TVA incluse au taux de 20 %

Reference 130037

Land registry surface area 4 ha 86 a 71 ca
Main building surface area 300 m2
Outbuilding surface area 1800 m2

 

 French Energy Performance Diagnosis

Regional representative
North Burgundy

Céline Berrette       +33 1 42 84 80 85


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NB: The above information is not only the result of our visit to the property; it is also based on information provided by the current owner. It is by no means comprehensive or strictly accurate especially where surface areas and construction dates are concerned. We cannot, therefore, be held liable for any misrepresentation.


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